Habibi Funk

Musique Originale De Films

auteur:

photo: 
a propos: 
Ahmed Malek - Algeria's Ennio MorriconeAhmed Malek was one of the most important musicians of the Algerian scene of the 1970s. His sountrack works that were composed for various Algerian movies of the time fuse Arabic influences with jazz, psych and funk influences. Dark cineastic soundscapes meet african Jazz at times reminicent of Mulatu. Original copies of his vinyl releases have been sold for enormous amounts. For this release we combined the strongest tracks from his releases with a selection of unreleased material straight from the families archive. The vinyl edition comes with a 8 page 12” size booklet, the cd version with a 16 page booklet with lot of unseen photos, an interview with the artist from 1978 and an introduction to Algerian cinema.Introduction: I still remember the first time I heard Ahmed Malek. It was 2012. Back then I didn’t know much about Arabic music, but I was about to leave Berlin for a couple of weeks to go to Tunisia. I was working as a project manager for a music recoding session which ended up being released by Jakarta Records as the “Sawtuha” release. I knew I would have some time off during my stay and I was certain that I would dedicate some of this time to diggin. I askesome people whether they knew of any titles that I should look for. Roskow, who also ended up re-mastering this release, told me about an Algerian composer called Ahmed Malek whose music was also released in Tunisia.Fast forward three years: Arabic records have become my number one hobby and luckily I got my hands on a copy of Ahmed Malek’s “Musique Originale De Films” album. I already knew some of the tracks but listening to the music the way it was originally released, and not as a crappy Youtube version, made me fall in love with Malek’s compositions all the more. It manages to create this very special mood: melancholic and reflective, emotional and touching, but never depressing. Even without having seen any of the pictures created for this, it immediately brings visuals to one’s imagination. Around that time I became captivated with the idea of reissuing some of Ahmed Malek’s music. I knew some people had tried to locate his family but, but with no success. In the end it was an incredible amount of luck that made it possible for you to read these words and listen to this record. I had a DJ gig in Beirut playing old Arabic records and I mentioned my passion for Ahmed Malek’s music to a friend. She said she knew one person in Algier, and as much as it would be a shot in the dark, she could ask her if she had an idea of how to find Malek’s family. Two weeks went by before I heard back, and what I got was incredibly good news. Her Algerian friend was the neighbor of Ahmed Malek’s daughter! I’m not a spiritual person, but it felt like the universe wanted to see this release happen.

pays:

Année:

format:

référence du label: 
HABIBI 003

genre:

état disque:

état pochette:

stock: 
1
Listen/Ecoute :
Prix panier: 
32.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Omar Gatlato
2. Tikjda
3. La Ville
4. La Ville (part 2)
5. Halla
6. Maya
7. Les Vacances De L'Inspecteur Tahar
Side 2
1. La Silence Des Cendres
2. Autopsie D'un Complot
3. La Cote
4. Henya
5. Bolero
6. Un Toit Et Une Famille
7. Omar Gatlatou (alternative version)

Second_hand: 
Non
Forthcoming: 
Non
Origine: 
Original
Newsletter: 
Non
Partager: 

Orkos

auteur:

photo: 
a propos: 
Completely unknown album by Salah Ragab's Cairo Jazz Band vocalist Maha, recorded in Cairo in 1979. Features productions by Hany Shenoda of Al Massrieen. Maha’s “Orkos,” originally released on cassette, is one of these standout musical diamonds that combines Jazz and Egyptian vocal traditions with Funk, Latin and Soul.

pays:

Année:

format:

label:

référence du label: 
HABIBI 0201

genre:

état disque:

état pochette:

stock: 
0
morceaux: 
Listen/Ecoute :
Prix panier: 
32.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Orkos
2. Kabl Ma Nessallem We Nemshy
3. We Mesheet
4. El Hob Matnassash
Side 2
1. Ala Shat El Nesyan
2. Law Laffeina El Ard
3. Ana Gaya

Second_hand: 
Non
Forthcoming: 
Non
Origine: 
Original
Newsletter: 
Non
Partager: 

Oghneya

photo: 

pays:

Année:

format:

label:

référence du label: 
HABIBI 0191

genre:

état disque:

état pochette:

stock: 
0
morceaux: 
Listen/Ecoute :
Prix panier: 
32.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Matar Al Sabah
2. Entazerni
3. Oghneya
Side 2
1. Edfeno Amwatakom Wanhadou
2. Matar Naem
3. Lahnon Lemra'ati Wa Beladi
4. Juma'a 6 Hziran

Second_hand: 
Non
Forthcoming: 
Non
Origine: 
Original
Newsletter: 
Non
Partager: 

The Slam! Years (1983-1988)

photo: 

pays:

Année:

format:

label:

référence du label: 
HABIBI 0181

état disque:

état pochette:

stock: 
0
morceaux: 
Listen/Ecoute :
Prix panier: 
32.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Tew'idni Dom
2. Yefkini Nesma' Sotak
3. Ayonha
4. Ya Saheb
5. Git Ya Sheta
6. Shantet Safar
Side 2
1. Oyoun Houriyat
2. Maktoub Aleina
3. Reet
4. Dari Demou'ek
5. Weyn Ayamak Weyn

Second_hand: 
Non
Forthcoming: 
Non
Origine: 
Original
Newsletter: 
Non
Partager: 

Chant Amazigh

auteur:

photo: 
a propos: 
Born in Kabylie, Algeria - a place that remains fundamental to his career - Majid Soula is a self-made musician, artist and producer. With no formal music education, Majid’s tenacity has led to a career that is still blossoming. His synths, driving drums, guitar & strong lyrics make a unique sound. A strong proponent for the rights of the Amazigh, he has a band that to this day plays shows, most linked to cultural events of the Amazigh diaspora in France, as well as in Belgium, Russia the UK and Sweden. He was part of a new wave of widely popular and successful Kabyle artists in the 1980s, such as Ait Menguellet, Lounès Matoub, Takfarinas, Idir and many more.Habibi Funk as a label is dedicated to re-releasing music from “The Arab World”, but this release shows how reductive this term can be, as the countries from North Africa and West Asia being summarized under this term include a vast number of languages and identities. Obviously, headlines sometimes come with limited space, and one can’t avoid using terms that paint a half-finished picture. That being the case, however, we are even more happy that Majid Soula liked our idea to work on a release of a selection of his music with us. The tracks here are incredible and need to be introduced to a new generation of listeners.For Majid Soula music is more than just entertainment. He considers himself an activist through music, and foremost a “chanteur engagé”, as he says of himself: „I take my inspiration from the daily life of my people and I share all their aspirations, mainly the official recognition of Tamazight as a language, culture and identity.”He still works on new music in his small home studio in Belleville and occasionally plays concerts for the Amazigh community of the city. We sincerely hope that for you reading this and listening to Majid’s album, his music will have the same revelatory feeling it had on us, and that this will be part of a momentum that will allow Majid to keep on working, playing, and sharing his message for many years to come.

pays:

Année:

format:

label:

référence du label: 
HABIBI 017

genre:

état disque:

état pochette:

stock: 
0
morceaux: 
Listen/Ecoute :
Prix panier: 
32.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Algerie Maroc
2. Lgira
3. Netseweth Sifassan Nagh
4. Win Terram
5. Tameghra
6. Ageruj
7. A Kem Gegh A Tamurt
8. Music Sans Frontiers
9. Ay Iheqqiyen

Second_hand: 
Non
Forthcoming: 
Non
Origine: 
Original
Newsletter: 
Non
Partager: 

Habibi Funk: An Eclectic Selection Of Music From The Arab World Part 2

photo: 
a propos: 
Second compilation by Habibi Funk, following the success of the first part, featuring a wide range of music from North Africa and the Middle East.2LP , mp3 download card and 12-page booklet

pays:

Année:

format:

label:

référence du label: 
HABIBI 015LP

genre:

état disque:

état pochette:

stock: 
0
morceaux: 
Listen/Ecoute :
Prix panier: 
35.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Douaa - Haditouni
2. Magdy Al Husseini - Music De Carneval
3. Fadoul - Ahl Jedba
Side 2
1. Sal Davis - Qaboos
2. Munir Khauli - Heik Ha Nishtghil?
3. Ouiness - Zina
4. Najib Alhoush - Ya Aen Daly
Side 3
1. Zohra - Badala Zamana
2. Ahmed Malek - Casbah
3. Ait Meslayen - El Fen
Side 4
1. Hamid El Shaeri - Reet
2. Ibrahim Hesnawi - Tendme
3. Tony Benn Feghaly - Free Blow (dub version)

Second_hand: 
Non
Forthcoming: 
Non
Origine: 
Original
Newsletter: 
Non
Partager: 

Fine Anyway

auteur:

photo: 

pays:

Année:

format:

label:

référence du label: 
HABIBI 016

genre:

état disque:

état pochette:

stock: 
0
morceaux: 
Listen/Ecoute :
Prix panier: 
26.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Lady Rain
2. Insomnia Blue
3. Fine Anyway
4. Express Line
5. My Baby, She Is As Down As I Am
6. Everything You Want
7. Waiting For It Everyday
8. Dancer On The Ceiling
9. Sad Sad Songs
10. Little Woman By My Side
Side 2
1. Every Body Is Going Home
2. Sitting In The Sun
3. Had To Come Back Wet
4. The Wizard
5. (Such A) Trip Thru Time
6. Keep Going
7. Gone Away Again

Second_hand: 
Non
Forthcoming: 
Non
Origine: 
Original
Newsletter: 
Non
Partager: 

Sibhana

photo: 

pays:

Année:

format:

label:

référence du label: 
HABIBI 012

genre:

état disque:

état pochette:

stock: 
0
morceaux: 
Listen/Ecoute :
Prix panier: 
18.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Sibhana
2. Damek Majeb
Side 2
1. Sibhana (instrumental)
2. Damek Majeb (instrumental)

Second_hand: 
Non
Forthcoming: 
Non
Origine: 
Original
Newsletter: 
Non
Partager: 

Mouasalat Ila Jacad El Ard

auteur:

photo: 

pays:

Année:

label:

référence du label: 
HABIBI 010

genre:

état disque:

état pochette:

stock: 
0
morceaux: 
Listen/Ecoute :
Prix panier: 
30.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Ana Damir El Motakallim
2. Mouasala Ila Jacad El Ard
3. Khobs
Side 2
1. Lam Azal
2. Ada
3. Yawma Konna
4. Intazirne

Second_hand: 
Non
Forthcoming: 
Non
Newsletter: 
Non
Partager: 

Al Hadaoui

photo: 
a propos: 
Habibi Funk is back with another album from Casablanca. Completely unreleased album which was recorded in Morocco in 1973 by three generation family band. A unique blend of Gnawa, Funk and Rock. Traditional Moroccan music meets electronic guitars and dense layers of percussion by a band that used to run in the same circles as Fadoul (And actually wrote one of his songs).Attarazat Addahabia & Faradjallah's album came to us as quite a mystery. Our friends from Radio Martiko got access to the studio archive of the Boussiphone label and a reel labeled “Faradjallah” was among the items they had found there. After listening to the selection of reels they borrowed, Radio Martiko felt it was not a fit for their label and helped us licensing it from Mr. Boussiphone instead. We knew nothing about the band. We just had the reel with the music but very little information. What we knew was that the music was incredible and very unique. Gnawa sounds were combined with funky electronic guitars, very dense layers of percussions and female backing vocals more reminiscent of musical styles further south than Morocco. We started asking around whether anyone knew the band with no immediate success until we asked Tony Day, a musician from Morocco who helped us during our search for Fadoul’s family. His sharp memory came through once again, remembering all the names of the Attarazat Addahabia band members and even how to contact the bands singer and leader Abdelakabir Faradjallah. After visiting him at his home in Casablanca with our Moroccan colleague Sabrina multiple times, he shared his personal story. His father arrived in Casablanca from Aqqa at the age of six and his mother came from Essaouira. Abdelakabir was born in the neighbourhood of Benjdia in 1942. Abdelakabir Faradjallah studied fine arts in Casablanca, graduating in 1962. He also played soccer in the second team of "Jeunesse Societe One". His brother-in-law Ibrahim Sadr worked for one of the biggest football teams of the time in Morocco called "Moroco Sportive Union", which allowed him to travel to France occasionally. While Ibrahim was never part of the band he brought along a few instruments from trips. Yet the majority of the instruments they could not afford to buy were build by Faradjallah and Abderrazak, Faradjallah's brother who passed away early. For instance they had built a Spanish guitar and a drum made of wood barrel and sheepskin by themselves.During the 1950s Faradjallah was booked as a singer for surprise parties with friends. He started to write his first songs including "L’gnawi" in 1967 and wanted to make people discover Gnawa culture, or maybe rather his take on the culture to be more exact. Faradjallah recalls his first interaction with the genre in the streets of the Dern neighbourhood, where he used to go to elementary school. Gnawa is one of the essential musical genres of Morocco. It combines ritual poetry with traditional dances and music linked with a spiritual foundation. Musically a lot of influences originated from West Africa as well as Sudan. Gnawa is usually played by a selection of specific instruments such as the qaraqab (large iron castanets centrally associated with the music), the hajhouj (a three string lute), guembri loudaâ (a three stringed bass instrument) and the tbel (large drums). People would put shells on their clothes and instruments and use incense at their parties. "Sidi darbo lalla - lala derbo khadem..." came from Gnawa verses Faradjallah used to sing when he was 14. The lyrics tackle a global (im)balance of power and the question of social status in this course. The band Attarazat Addahabia was formed in 1968. The original line-up included 14 members, all from the same family. They played their first small concerts here and there starting in 1969. Later in 1973 they performed bigger shows for instance at the Municipal Theatre followed by the "Al Massira Show" at Velodrome Stadium in downtown Casablanca. Their first album "Al Hadaoui" (the one you are listening to) was recorded at Boussiphone studios in 1972 and was never released before. Nobody seems to remember the exact reason why Boussiphone ended up deciding not to put the album out. The album's title track also served as the basis for Fadoul's "Maktoub Lah", who frequented the same circles as the band for some time. Their shows sometimes could go as long as 12 hours, starting at 5pm in the afternoon, with an occasional break here and there. In the 1980s the band took a brief break. Faradjallah recalled the reason for that break like this: "Zaki, the bands drummer, had fallen in love with a young girl from Mohammedia. Soon after, he fell very ill. The group members were convinced that the girl had given him ‘s'hor’ (a kind of local Moroccan version of "black magic"). For four years, the whole group stopped playing. It was unthinkable to find another drummer to replace Zaki, even temporarily." So they waited four years for Zaki to "get back on his feet" before going back on stage. Apart from very few gigs here and there Faradjallah stopped playing music in the mid 1990s. Some members from the younger generations formed a new band and still play frequently to this day. Faradjallah runs a television repair shop coupled offerings beverages and snacks in the Belevedere /Ains Sbaa district of Casablanca. While Faradjallah was primarily a musician, he would work for the local cinema and paint their posters for new movies by hand and he designed all artworks and cover posters of the band. And this eventually led to him participating actively in our first exhibition dealing with Habibi Funk’s work in Dubai 2018. He helped us by creating calligraphic complementations on large photo prints for that show.

pays:

Année:

label:

référence du label: 
HABIBI 011

genre:

état disque:

état pochette:

stock: 
0
morceaux: 
Listen/Ecoute :
Prix panier: 
24.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Al Hadaoui
2. Albaki
3. Moulate Salef
4. Taali
5. Aflana
6. Chama'a
7. Laddaba

Second_hand: 
Non
Forthcoming: 
Non
Newsletter: 
Non
Partager: 

Pages

S'abonner à RSS - Habibi Funk